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Bulldog Care

Bulldogs are very heat sensitive and can over heat easily.  Overheating is fatal for Bulldogs.  If you notice your dog is panting heavily get them cooled down and calmed down quickly.

Most Bulldogs can not swim.  If your Bulldog is going to be around water invest in a good Bulldog life jacket.  If you have a pool make sure your Bulldog is never left unattended anywhere with pool access.

Bee stings can be fatal for Bulldogs quickly.  If you suspect your Bulldog has been stung, administer Benadryl immediately, if you see any swelling in the face or neck area go to the vet immediately. 

Bulldog Medicine Chest

Vaseline. -Use this on his nose, on his eye wrinkles, any place you need to soothe and waterproof but don't need to medicate. Use it also on the thermometer when you take his temperature.

Plastic RealLemon. -If he gets phlegm in his throat and chokes on it, a couple squirts of juice from the plastic lemon will help clear it out.

A good rectal thermometer.

Benadryl.- Either capsule or liquid. Use this if the dog is stung by a bee or other insect, and for minor allergies.

Gold Bond Powder A good all purpose medicated powder. Also good for  wrinkles, tail pockets and hot spots.

Kaopectate. For minor diarrhea. 



Never ever give your Bulldog a rawhide toy. Even Bulldog puppies can tear a piece off the rawhide and choke on it. Puppies like knotted socks to shake and play tug of war with. They also like Nylabone and Kong toys. Many like to play with balls, but be sure the ball is too big to lodge in the throat. They like cotton tug toys like Booda Bones.  The only real difference between the toys for a puppy and the toys for an adult Bulldog is size. 


A Bulldog should eat out of a stainless steel bowl which has a flat bottom and straight sides.  How often you feed a dog a year or more old depends on your preference and the dog's. Most dogs do well on one meal a day. Some do better on two meals a day. You may prefer to feed in the morning or the evening. This is up to you. If you like it and the dog likes it, it's the right way. A Bulldog usually eats puppy kibble until it is  a year old. . The best change is to the adult version of the puppy kibble you have been feeding him. It does not hurt your Bulldog to change from one brand of dog food to another and then to another and so on as long as each change is done by gradually, substituting more and more of the new brand for the old. If your Bulldog is spayed or neutered or as it ages and becomes less active, you may need to start feeding a reduced calorie dog food to keep it from becoming too fat. Most good brands of dog food have such a kibble. Again, it's best if you stay with the same brand you've been feeding and change to the "lo-fat" version.

Whatever its age, your Bulldog should have fresh water available at all times. It is not really necessary to add to a good kibble. But you may find your dog prefers "goodies" on his food, or does a little better with some. The most common supplements are cottage cheese, yogurt and oil. Cottage cheese is especially good for growing puppies since the Bulldog must grow a lot of heavy bone in a short time. About a tablespoon per feeding. Yogurt helps to keep the digestive system working well, about a teaspoon per feeding. Oil helps to keep the coat and skin in good condition, about a teaspoon twice a day. Corn or canola oil is best - do not give your Bulldog any oil which contains soybean oil. You may also give your Bulldog a vitamin supplement.  We use and recommend NuVet Plus. Learn about NuVet Plus here.  To order go to the website at: order code: 13212


 Where do you bathe a Bulldog? Any place you want to and can! Some Bulldoggers have a big deep sink, some use the bath tub, some use the kitchen sink (if you have two kitchen sinks fill one with soapy water and use the other for rising), in the summer some wash the dog on the lawn. You need a place where you can control the dog, where you can easily control the water supply and where you can rinse the dog thoroughly. It's a good idea, especially with a puppy, to take the dog outside to "do his thing" just before you bathe him. Gather up all the things you will need before you start. You will need: shampoo,  wash cloth, towels. You will want a mild, no tears shampoo, such as Johnson & Johnson No Tears.  Wet the dog thoroughly from just behind the ears to the tips of the toes on his hind feel. Be sure his underside is wet, too, not just the top and sides. Apply the shampoo starting at his neck and working back. Work the shampoo in to be sure you get all the way through his hair to the skin. Pay special attention to his paws (wash between the toes), his tail (clean all around the base), and the genital area.  Wet the wash cloth and use it to dampen the dog's face and ears. Put some shampoo on the washcloth and wash the dog's face. Wash the wrinkles over the nose, on the forehead, around the nose and under the eyes. Wash his nose. Wash his ears, inside and out. Now rinse. Rinse until you are sure every bit of the dog, especially in the wrinkles and tight places, is thoroughly rinsed and there is no shampoo any place. Wipe the inside of the ears with a dry towel or wash cloth.  Dry the dog  with towels, be sure to dry in the wrinkles and under the tail.  Rub a dab of Vaseline onto his nose to help keep it soft. You can then let him air dry or use a hair dryer to finish the drying. It's best to keep the dog inside until it is completely dry - about two hours.


 The nails should be kept as short as possible. You may use dog nail clippers or an electric grinder.  Be especially careful not to cut into the quick. On white nails you can see where the quick begins. On black nails cut just to the curve of the nail. The clippers usually leave a rough edge. Use a good dog nail file to smooth them off. If you use en electric grinder, be very, very careful. It is easy to grind into the quick. The main thing is to make the experience as pleasant as possible for the dog so be really careful when cutting nails and don't cut into the quick. If you dog takes frequent walks on pavement or such, it will usually wear the nails down, so again, be careful as there may not be very much nail to cut. This is especially true of black nails which seem to wear more than the white ones.


Bulldogs tend to have messy face wrinkles. The older they get, the messier the wrinkles. How often you clean these wrinkles depends on the dog. Some do very well if you clean the wrinkles a couple of times a week. Some need it on a daily basis. When you clean the wrinkles, wash his nose and apply a good rub of Vaseline to keep it soft. It's better to clean more often than you think you need to than not often enough. You can clean the wrinkles with a soft, damp cloth and then dry. Or you can wash them using the shampoo you use to bathe the dog. Be sure to rinse thoroughly and dry thoroughly. One of the best ways is to wipe the wrinkles clean with Baby Wipes with lanolin and aloe. Whatever method you use, be sure to get the deep nose wrinkle clean. You may need to put Gold Bond powder in the deep nose wrinkle. If it is irritated Gold Bond will help to heal. A lot of Bulldogs have "tear stains" of varying degrees of color. If the stain is bad, in addition to cleaning you may want to try to remove the stain. There are many treatments, you may have to try several before you find one that works for you. Some of the commercial products used are Angel Eyes and Occu-brite. strong,

 Problems and Treatments

The second best medical advice any one can give you is, "Find a veterinarian who knows and likes Bulldogs." This is one of the reasons why it's a good idea to join your local Bulldog Specialty Club. The members can usually refer you to a veterinarian who is familiar with Bulldogs and who likes them. Believe it or not - some veterinarians don't like Bulldogs, and no matter how good a veterinarian lie is, he's not a good one for your Bulldog. The very best advice is to know your Bulldog. Check the entire dog daily. Know if he isn't eating, if he isn't playing, if he doesn't seem quite right. Know immediately if something is wrong so you can take appropriate action. There are several minor ailments you can treat at home. Remember that if a home remedy doesn't cure the problem in two days, it's time to take the dog to the veterinarian. Do not keep trying various methods of home medication.

Liquid Medications- The easiest way to give a liquid medication is with a syringe. You can get them from your veterinarian or most drug stores. You want at least a 2cc size. Discard the needle. Pull the proper amount of liquid into the syringe, open the dog's mouth and "shoot" the liquid onto the back of his tongue.

Pills and capsules- Open the dog's mouth, push the pill or capsule as far down his throat as possible, then hold his mouth shut and stroke his throat until he swallows. This has been known to work. Or wrap the pill or capsule in a bit of ground beef or cheese and feed it to the dog. This usually works.

Vomiting- For minor upset stomach Pepto Bismol or a similar medicine works best. Dose is according to the dog's weight. If there is hard vomiting or if the upset lasts more than 24 hours, take the dog to your veterinarian.

Diarrhea- Kaopektate is most usually prescribed for minor diarrhea. Dose amount depends on the dog's weight. If the diarrhea continues longer than 24 hours or if there is blood in the stool, take the dog to the veterinarian.

Hot Spots- These are red, weepy, itchy spots. No one seems to really know what causes them. It could be fleas, food, allergies, etc. Clean the area thoroughly. Apply Gold Bond Powder 3x per day.  You should see improvement by the second day, if not, take the dog to the veterinarian.

Interdigital Cysts -This is another problem that no one seems to be sure what the cause is But you'll know one when you see an angry red swelling pop up between the dog's toes. First examine the paw carefully, especially the underside between the pads to be sure there is no foreign matter (a thorn or such). If there is, take it out. Clean the area. Remedies include: (I) Soaking the paw in warm water and Epsom Salts (2) Desenex foot powder. (3) ,Preparation H.   With all these treatments, it's best to continue the treatment for two to three days after the cyst is gone.

Fungus Spots- These are somewhat like hot spots, but they are not weepy. Be sure you clean away all the "scabby" material. Wash the area and treat with  any good anti-fungal ointment. 

Facial Acne or Eczema- Bulldogs are forever putting their faces into all kinds of strange places. Some are susceptible to topical bacterial infections. The dog gets pimples on his face and chin. Usually you can clear these up just by washing and rubbing in an anti-biotic ointment. Or you can try OXYIO (benzoil peroxide) which you can purchase at a drug store. If they persist, you will need to get an oral anti-biotic medication from your veterinarian.

Eyes -Dust, wind, pollen, the things that make your eyes burn and water have the same effect on your Bulldog. You can rinse the eyes out with a solution such as Clear Eyes. If the eyes are badly irritated, use a contact lens ointment such as Bausch & Lomb Duolube. For any other eye ailment, take the dog to your veterinarian.

Cherry Eye- The gland which normally resides under the lower eye lid at the inside corner of the eye will sometimes "pop" out. This is not as horrible as it appears to be and does not require emergency treatment. It does require treatment at the earliest possible time by a veterinarian recommended for "Cherry Eye'. The quicker the dog gets treatment the better the chance for successful treatment without removing the gland. Removal of the gland often results in a "dry" eye.

Tail- Some Bulldog's have their tail set in a pocket. If yours does you will need to make a special effort to keep that pocket clean and dry. Wipe it out frequently with baby wipes.  Be sure to dry it thoroughly and apply medicated Gold Bond powder.

Temperature- You take his temperature just as you take a small baby's - rectally. Use a good rectal thermometer, lubricate generously with Vaseline, insert gently, hold onto the thermometer dogs have been known to "suck" them in!, wait about five minutes, pull out and read. Normal temperature for most dogs is from 100.5 to 101.

Ice -Start giving your Bulldog pieces of ice to eat when he is still a small puppy so that he learns to like it. Luckily, most Bulldogs do. This is a great way to cool down a hot dog. Blocks of ice make a great summer time toy.

***Insect Stings- If your Bulldog is stung by a bee or other insect, give him Benadryl (either capsule or liquid) and watch him closely for the next half hour. You may also apply an ice pack to the area where he was stung if you know where it is. If the area around the sting swells and hardens, if hives appear, if he seems to have difficulty breathing - rush him to the veterinarian. This is no time to dally, your dog's life depends on quick treatment.